Comparison of Type 1 and 2 Diabetes

Type 1 and 2 diabetes originate when an individual’s blood sugar is too high for a body to handle. A hormone called insulin helps the glucose in the blood to get into cells to be used for energy purposes. In type 2 diabetes, a body cannot produce a sufficient amount of insulin or does not utilize it properly. On the contrary, most type 1 diabetes affected individuals’ immune system strikes and destroys the cells that form and produce insulin. Consequently, the special cells inside a patient’s body completely stop developing insulin, which means such people must take insulin daily to stay alive. Thus, the primary difference between different types of diabetes is that type one diabetes is more serious, as people continuously rely on particular medications to continue living. Currently, only about five percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 1 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2017b). Whereas type two is less severe and considered preventable and possible to delay.

Another critical difference between the two is the causation of the disease. Type 2 diabetes can be prompted by numerous factors affecting one’s lifestyle, such as being overweight or obese, and lack of exercising (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2017a). On the other hand, type 1 is caused by genes and different environmental factors, including viruses that can provoke the disease. Overall, the severity and the causation are one of the primary differences between diabetes one and two. Furthermore, people affected by both types of diabetes must take insulin as their primary medication; however, the dosage would be different for each one. Individuals who have type 1 must take insulin every day, whereas type 2 only requires insulin during special occasions. Additionally, people affected by diabetes type 1 might be required to take a distinct kind of diabetes medication that operates with insulin, such as pramlintide 1 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2017b). Lastly, individuals with type 2 need to follow a special diabetes care plan, which includes specific lifestyle changes.

References

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2017a). The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Web.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2017b). The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Web.

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