Nursing Philosophies, Models, and Theories in Preventing Respiratory Complications

The project ‘Preventing Respiratory Complications on Patients Undergoing Interventional Radiological Procedures under Conscious Sedation at Kendall Regional Medical Center’ will relate to Martha Rogers’ Unitary human being theory, Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring, and Madeleine Leininger’s Transcultural Nursing Theory.

Nursing Philosophy Main concept of Philosophy Project significance
Martha Rogers’ Unitary human being theory Unitary human being theory operates such general concepts as human-unitary human beings, energy field, environmental field, cosmology, nursing itself, and scope of nursing. In terms of a more specific theme, there are also such concepts as openness, homeodynamics, reciprocity, synchrony, and integrity (Rogers, 1988).
The primary concepts refer to the understanding of the perspective of relationships between a nurse, a patient, and the universe in general, whereas the specific concepts manifest the key features a nurse should maintain in their practice.
The integration and unity between human beings, environment, in which they live, and the universe are the key features of Martha Rogers’ unitary human being theory.
Rogers emphasizes that nursing is not merely “a sum of knowledge gathered from other fields” (Rogers, 1994, p. 33). The practice of nursing requires knowledge from a variety of fields, but it is not itself limited to it. From the point of view of project significance, it means that nurses need directly respond to the environment in which they act.
In other words, the nursing practice designed, for example, for Kendall Regional Medical Center should be oriented to its specifics in terms of social, economic, and cultural issues, but, at the same time, be able to address the universal nature of human beings.
Nursing Philosophy Main concept of Philosophy Project significance
Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring Watson supports the idea that daily nursing practice is something that requires “language order, structure, and clarity of concepts and worldview underlying nursing as a distinct discipline and profession” (Watson & Woodward, 2010). The major concepts determining the key elements of the nursing practice include so-called “carative factors, transpersonal caring moment, caring consciousness, energetic presence, interntionality, healing modalities”, human-environmental field, unitary oneness, advanced caring, and other determinants of the specific relationship between nurse and patient at the moment of care (Watson & Woodward, 2010). From the conceptual standpoint, the theory of human caring entertains the idea of metaphysical relationships between a nurse and a patient and operates the vocabulary from the field of philosophy. However, in terms of use for the project, the theory also has its advantages. Firstly, ten carative features proposed by Watson may help to adapt the quality nursing care to a particular environment (Watson, 1999). On the other hand, the second important feature is that the theory promotes the idea that a nurse should, first of all, provide a protective environment. It is important in the context of change project because there is a possibility that patients might feel vulnerable.
Nursing Philosophy Main concept of Philosophy Project significance
Madeleine Leininger’s Transcultural nursing theory Leininger points out the fact that the concept of cultural care has two roots. Whereas care is purely a notion from the field of nursing, culture was originally an anthropological term (Leininger, 1988). It means that the major concept of cultural care attempts not only to analyze human being in a variety of different aspects but also to try to learn those nuances in order to provide better care. The concepts supporting the idea include “culturally congruent nursing care”, “cultural care diversities”, and “cultural care universalities” (Leininger, 1988). In terms of adapting project for a multicultural community, the transcultural nursing theory is especially significant. One of the major determinants of the theory is the fact that it can be applicable to any community in order to attend to its particular issues. Meanwhile, it is important for a nurse to ensure trustful relationships, which is only possible if he or she understand the cultural specifics of the patient’s background (Leininger, 2002). On the other hand, the theory does not ignore the ubiquitous elements of the human nature because it also supports the idea that there are certain universalities in the framework of nursing care.

The first element is Martha Rogers’ unitary human being theory. Its philosophy as a set of paradigmatic principles will assist the project in training nurses to stay responsive to the precise circumstance of each patient. The model of the nursing practice designed, for example, for Kendall Regional Medical Center, should be oriented to its specifics and be able to address the universal nature of human beings.

The second element of care is Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Its carative elements provide a strong theory in a form of almost a structured guidance. Its main contribution is the need to find a bond with a patient, to ensure trustful relationships because the moment of care allows the patient to feel less vulnerable. Given the fact that any complication with the disease is quite stressful, it is especially important.

Transcultural nursing theory as the third element contributes to the understanding of the needs of the multicultural community. The required relationships of trust and console between nurse and patient would not be possible if someone experiences discomfort. In this regard, nursing meta-paradigm manifests itself in a form of nurses’ self-reflection. It is important that a nurse monitors their own experiences along with the patient’s because it would help to improve their relationships.

References

Leininger, M. M. (1988). Leininger’s Theory of Nursing: Cultural Care Diversity and Universality. Nursing Science Quarterly, 1(4), 152-160.

Leininger, M. (2002). Culture Care Theory: A Major Contribution to Advance Transcultural Nursing Knowledge and Practices. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 13(3), 189-192.

Rogers, M. E. (1988). Nursing Science and Art: A Prospective. Nursing Science Quarterly, 1(3), 99-101.

Rogers, M. E. (1994). The Science of Unitary Human Beings: Current Perspectives. Nursing Science Quarterly, 7(1), 33-35.

Watson, J. (1999). Nursing: Human Science and Human Care: A Theory of Nursing. New York, New York: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Watson, J., & Woodward, T. K. (2010). Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Nursing Theories and Nursing Practice, 3(1), 351-369.

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